Winter walks and picnics: welcome to Slow Living.

If there was a competition for how full you can keep your regular mug of coffee (without a lid) whilst driving, I would be the winner. Through a skillful act of counterbalancing, I can attune the coffee in my cup to the sways of my car, and regularly arrive at work after a fifteen minute journey relatively unscathed by coffee stains. I do have a reusable takeaway cup, though – but I rarely have the spare time in the morning to a) locate it, and b) wash it up (it is currently encrusted with mould from the last time I was feeling practical – a long time ago). By now you can probably guess that I’m the “just-in-time” – veering towards the “tad-late” – type.  Continue…

One great (and surprising) way to enjoy the outdoors this Winter.

Come rain or shine (or snow, sleet, and gale force winds), my mother would shut all of us children outside for half an hour every day. A monstrous heap of multiple coats, scarves and hats, I would stand by the door window and concentrate all the miserable expression I could muster into the 3 or so visible inches of my face. With two imploring eyes and a thoroughly pink nose, I hoped to extract some kind of sympathy from my mother’s adamantly turned back.  Continue…

Finger-food for thought: why we have afternoon teas.

From an evolutionary perspective, fattening up for winter is imperative if we are to stay warm, and it is therefore only natural that we should be hankering for afternoon teas in Autumn as intensely as we hunt for a mate in Spring. It was this deep-rooted, almost primal instinct to indulge in an afternoon tea that got me pondering the philosophical question: why is it that we have afternoon teas? Continue…